Never Fail Baking Powder Biscuits

My husband’s first comment was “Now THESE are GOOD!” These biscuits are very light, as you can see, tender, but not crumbly. Even the ones I patted out to use the scraps were tender. The dough is very easy to work with, I sprinkle my board with flour I keep in a shaker for making pasta.
If I’m in a hurry, I just cut my biscuits into squares with a sharp bench knife. If you use a cutter or knife, be sure to cut straight down; do not twist, to get a good even rise and that “split” in the middle of your biscuit. 
This very basic recipe is the same in both the 1950 Betty Crocker Picture Cookbook and the Farm Journal "Homemade Bread" 1969.
Never-Fail Baking Powder Biscuits
2 cups Flour, All-purpose – sifted (9 ounces)
1 tablespoon Baking Powder
1 teaspoon Salt
1/4 cup Shortening  
3/4 cup Milk
  • Sift dry ingredients together. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse meal or crumbs.
  • Make a hollow in the flour-shortening mixture and stir in enough milk to make a soft dough that leaves the sides of the bowl and sticks to the mixing fork.  Don't overmix.
  • Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead with the heel of the hand 10 to 12 times. Gentle kneading is an important step, to produce good volume, fine flaky texture and good shape and crust.  Overkneading with a heavy hand will give your biscuits a tough texture.
  • Roll 3/4" thick.  Cut with a 2 1/2" cutter; place close together on a baking sheet for soft sides, 1" apart for crusty sides on ungreased baking sheet. I use parchment paper. Bake in very hot oven (450°) for 10-12 minutes. Serve at once.
  • If using self-rising flour, omit baking powder and salt.
  • For drop biscuits, increase the milk from 3/4 cup to 1 cup.
10 to 12 biscuits
Per Serving: 124 Calories; 5g Fat (36.5% calories from fat); 3g Protein; 17g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 6mg Cholesterol; 307mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1 Fat
 2010 COST: 42¢ for the recipe or 4¢ per biscuit
COST: On the same day the cheapest store brand refrigerated biscuits 6¢ per biscuit, name brand biscuits 10.2¢ per biscuit
The cheapest store brand frozen biscuits 5.3¢ per biscuit, the name brand frozen biscuits 9.2¢ 

17 comments:

  1. I just HAVE to try these-- soon! My southern-born mother and her southern relatives were expert biscuit makers. Never a bad biscuit from any of them. So,... this is my goal. I like your tip about making sure the cutter is held in straight vertical position-- sharing tips is good! Thanks.

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  2. I've never had any luck making biscuits before this recipe. I tried it today and they turned out so delicious. My 85 year old mother said they taste just like my grandmother's, which is a very humbling compliment.

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    1. Way to go, Terry! This is probably identical to your grandmother's recipe...it's that basic...simple is often the best.

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  3. Hello, I just dropped by your blog searching for the old Betty Crocker drop biscuit recipe. Thank you for the recipe and the advice for making the biscuits. Your blog looks interesting and I plan to stop by to check out more recipes soon!

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  4. Hi Karen, Glad to have a new reader and I hope the biscuits work well for you. They really are good. Come visit our blog anytime.

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  5. These were so easy and fit very nicely under my pork steak alfredo!!!

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    1. Glad you liked them...we think they're the best!

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  6. OK, stupid here. Can that shortening be Crisco? I know you have access to good lard, but I don't.

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    1. Yes, this recipe calls for shortening like Crisco instead of lard. Myrna likes this version too.

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    2. Yes, I always use Crisco in mine and this is a very good and simple recipe. Great for biscuits and gravy.

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  7. OK thanks! Gonna try it. Now another question: You use parchment paper. Have you had or tried a Non-Stick Silicone Baking Mat? we've never bought parchment paper, but are wondering about this silicone baking mat. Thanks for everything!

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    1. I have used both and prefer the parchment paper, but that is just me. My daughter likes the baking mat. Both work well but you can fold up the paper and threw it away whereas the mat needs to be washed and I find it gets sticky after using for some time. Again a personal preference.

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    2. I agree with Myrna...have used both, still like the parchment paper.
      You can reuse the parchment paper for some things that aren't sticky.

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  8. Thanks! I just found 200 12x16 on eBay for $13.79 free shipping and no sales tax. That's 7¢ each. Is that a good buy?

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    1. Yes, I just ordered some from King Arthur Flour and they are 19.95 for 100 sheets, free shipping today. Usually you pay for shipping from them.

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    2. I like the quality of the parchment from King Arthur Flour, and usually buy the sheets from them with the free shipping about this time of year like Myrna does.
      The boxed parchment rolls from Costco are also good quality and often only available before the holiday season...some of the supermarket parchment is not as good quality.
      I usually buy a years worth when I can get the holiday sales.

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    3. I have to agree about the quality of the parchment from King Arthur Flour. I have bought from the supermarket stock and it is not as good a quality. I don't know what brand you are looking at on ebay. I like the precut sheets as they are so handy when baking for the Holidays and I do quite a bit of baking.

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