Flemish Carbonade



  This is a version of Flemish Carbonade.  Several years ago, our older sister Kay who lived most of her married life in Texas, gave me some Texas cookbooks. In one of them was a very simple version of Flemish Carbonade. While I am sure that American Test Kitchen has a different and more complicated version, this works quite well for us.
  Serve it with a lot of mashed potatoes or rice or noodles. I seem to do it more with the mashed potatoes. So here is my version of Inez’s Flemish Carbonade. Not fast, but easy to get together and will cook with out a lot of attention.
Inez’s Flemish Carbonade
1 pound of round steak (our butcher tenderized it)
Oil 
3 medium onions sliced in rings
1 can or bottle dark beer
1 teaspoon butter
Salt and Pepper
Brown sugar to taste
  Cut round steak in 3 inch pieces. Brown in a small amount of oil. Remove the meat and add onions, stirring to brown. Remove and off of the heat, pour in the can of beer, stirring in the drippings from the pan. Add butter to beer mixture.
Put meat and onions in a casserole dish pour the beer mixture over. Add 1 or 2 bay leaves and a teaspoon dried thyme leaves. Cover and bake in a slow oven, 325° for 2 to 3 hours or until tender. About an hour before it is done, add a tablespoon or less of brown sugar. You want a sweet sour flavor.
  Served over mashed potatoes, rice or noodles, great cold weather food.

6 comments:

  1. It really sounds like the stew meat they make in Belgium ; ) I make it a lot in Winter too and I live near the Belgian border in The Netherlands ; )
    Have a wonderful day.

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  2. Hi Monique, Good to know this is like a real Carbonade. Sue and I have some Holland dutch in our ancestory, so we grew up with versions of this stew also. Hope you have a great day and thanks for reading our blog.

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  3. I would have to leave the bay out, but the rest sounds delicious!

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  4. Do you not like the flavor of bay leaf?

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  5. Can this be canned? I would love to put some of this up.... seems like you should be able to.... hmmmm.

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  6. That is an interesting thought Terri. I don't know how the taste would hold up to canning. If you try it, let us know how it comes out.
    Can it in a pressure canner, not a hot water bath, at the time for meat to be safe.

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