Make it Yourself...Pie tools


  
Top L, Clockwise:  Pastry Pro blender, Danesco pastry mat,
Sue's pastry/bread board, Myrna's "antique" rolling pin and ceramic plates,
Sue's OXO rolling pin and assorted pie plate collection, Ateco cutters.
There are not a lot of tools needed to make pie crust. A board to roll the crust on, a rolling pin and a pie plate to put the crust in. 
There are many types of pie plates. Glass is the most common, with metal plates and ceramic plates also. Sue has 9, 8, and 7 inch sizes plus 5” pans.  I have 4 ten inch deep- dish pans, 3 nine inch pans, 2 ten inch pans, 1 eight inch  pan and a 10 ½” ceramic pie plate that belonged to our Grandmother and a 9” ceramic pan that is mine. Looks like I own 12 pie plates. Somehow they seem to multiply at our house. We both prefer the glass pans because they brown the bottom crust better. Over the years I have had metal pans but have given them away. If I am making pies for a sale or to give away I will buy the foil pie pans from the grocery store. They are inexpensive and I don’t have to worry about getting them back. The smaller size glass pie plates are hard to find now. Sometimes you can find them at flea markets or thrift stores. Especially nice for small families.
  When it comes to rolling pins, use what feels comfortable for you to roll with. Mine is bright yellow and I don’t know for sure what material it is made from is. I received it as a shower gift 55 years ago and it is still going strong. Sue uses a OXO rolling pin. Neither of us uses the type of pins that are all one piece. 
  When I was first married I had pull-out bread boards right above my cabinet drawers and we had them growing up at our house and my grandmother’s house. I am not sure why they do not put them in kitchens anymore. I use a maple board I bought in 1973 and Sue has a very nice reversible  board with a lip to keep it in place and with pie circle sizes on it.  The Danesco mat allows you to cut on it and is fairly nonstick. Your kitchen counter will work in a pinch, but depending on the material, you may not want to cut on it.
  I do have a large cutter set, thanks to Sue, to make crusts for hand pies. They are handy to own and also make nice circles to top pot pies with. 
  The last two items you should have are a pastry blender or pastry fork to cut in the shortening and a bench cutter for cutting dough and scraping your board. Really not a lot of fancy equipment needed, but do be sure your rolling pin fits your hands and is easy for you to use.

11 comments:

  1. My grandpa loved pie and my grandma was a great cook. They lived on a farm and while Grandpa was out doing the early morning chores, Grandma cooked biscuits, gravy and oatmeal every day. But the first thing she cooked every morning was 1 or 2 pies. Her only tools were glass pie pans, a wood rolling pin and a regular fork.

    I don't bake pies as often as Grandma but I always think if her whenever I do.
    I need a new pastry cutter and that Pastry Pro one in your picture looks good, I am going to check it out.

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    1. I really like my Pastry Pro (they don't pay me to say that!), but I use it in those shallower, flat-bottomed 4 or 8 cup Pyrex measuring cups or a larger bowl. It doesn't work as well in really rounded smaller bowls. The flat bottom is about 3 3/4" wide.
      I like it because it doesn't clog up with dough as easily as my old pastry cutter, and it also will mash potatoes!

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  2. Question: when baking in the foil disposable pans, do you adjust the length of time or the temp? I will be baking for a church bazaar this week. Thanks for any tips you might have.

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    1. Preheat a cookie sheet in the oven while it is preheating; then place your pies in foil pans on the hot sheet (carefully), and bake. Let the pies cool on the sheet too, so the foil pans won't buckle.
      Bake at the usual temperature for your recipe, until done, usually the same time called for in your recipe. Be sure your pies are centered on the sheet, and it is centered in your oven. Good luck.
      Our local orchard, which sells hundreds of pies "ready-to-bake" in foil pans, recommends this method in their directions, and I find it works well.

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  3. Nadine, The only thing I do is to put them on a flat rimless cookie sheet so they are easier to handle. It might take a few minutes extra to bake that way, maybe five or so but saves tipping it over when I take it out. I don't buy the pie crust in the pans just the empty pans.

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  4. I have a small collection of glass pie plates. I don't cook in them for fear of breaking one.

    I'd like to say I make pie crust, but have to confess that I don't.

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  5. I use my old glass pie plates and even the ceramic plate of my Grandmothers. They really shouldn't break.Not everyone bakes pie crust either. My family just doesn't like the frozen crusts after all these years of homemade crusts.

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  6. love that pastry board with all the circles....I think I need one of those....I don't like using the plastic ones...I have all Fiesta Ware pie bakers...small, medium and large....they bake a GREAT pie...

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  7. Thanks for the tips for the alum. disp. pans! I've had my glass pie pans for a very long time. I sometimes use them for mixing breading, etc., for other things as well.

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  8. Hi Nadine,
    I use my glass pans for breading also. They really work well for that, don't they. Good as always to hear from you.

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  9. Shelley, I envy you your Fiesta Ware pie bakers. I have some Fiesta Ware but not the pie pans. I always wondered how they worked. Good to know that they are so good.

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