Rhubarb Strawberry Ice Cream

 I have been meaning to try this ice cream since last year but we ate all the rhubarb in pies. This year I saved enough to make a batch of Rhubarb and Strawberry ice cream using a recipe from Martha Stewart Living
 If you like rhubarb you will like this ice cream. Not too sweet and not too strawberry tasting which I liked. Also we thought it had a excellent flavor and texture.
 I must say it involves a little work, but worth it. I didn’t have any kirsch so used chambord. You could also use the juice from maraschino cherries or just milk.
 The alcohol however, keeps it from getting icy crystals when it is in the freezer as well as a flavor boost. There isn’t a lot for the amount of ice cream and we feel that is a good tradeoff to keep ice cream from getting icy. I thought there was a little more than a quart of ice cream when it was finished.
Rhubarb Strawberry Ice Cream
YIELD: 1 QUART
Ingredients
1 pound trimmed rhubarb, cut into ½ inch pieces (about 3 ½ cups)
½ cup sugar
2 tablespoons water
8 ounces ripe strawberries
1 cup heavy cream 
½ cup milk
6 tablespoons sugar 
2 tablespoons kirsch
Directions
 Place rhubarb, ½ cup sugar, and the water In a saucepan over medium heat; bring to a boil; reduce heat to medium-low and let simmer, stirring often until rhubarb is very tender and beginning to fall apart. Remove from heat; transfer to a bowl; set aside.
 Place strawberries in a food processor and puree. Strain through a fine sieve into a bowl; set aside.
 Scald cream and milk in a saucepan over medium heat. Do not let boil. Remove from heat, add the remaining 6 tablespoons sugar and stir until sugar is dissolved. Allow mixture to cool to room temperature. Combine cooked rhubarb, strawberry puree, cream mixture and kirsch. Cover with plastic wrap and chill at least 2 hour or overnight. Freeze in an ice- cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

2 comments:

  1. Rhubarb is not a common ingredient we use here in Mississippi.
    I tried to grow it for the big leaves one year, but it couldn't take our heat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It really is a northern plant What where you going to do with the leaves, they are not safe to eat.
      I do feel sorry for folks that can't get it easily. One of our favorite early spring time treats.

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