Sorghum Dijon Roasted Salmon


We love salmon, and I’m always looking for new ways to prepare it.  I always have sorghum on hand, and grainy mustard too, so I combined them for the glaze this time.  My husband commented that it seems counter-intuitive that something sweet like sorghum would combine well with mustard, but we could certainly have this recipe again.  
We usually buy locally-made sorghum from Maasdam’s, from Lynnville, Iowa or from Daniel Hoover from Rich Hill, Missouri.  Sorghum is great with corn bread, in cookies, and anywhere else you might use mild molasses.                
Sorghum Dijon Roasted Salmon
  3        tablespoons  sorghum
  2          teaspoons  Grainy Mustard
     1/4      teaspoon  freshly ground black pepper
  4                     salmon fillets -- (6-ounce)
     1/2      teaspoon  salt
Preheat the oven to 450°.
Combine the sorghum, the mustard, and the black pepper in a small bowl.
Spray a baking pan lined with aluminum foil evenly with cooking spray.
Lay the salmon fillets evenly spaced on the baking pan.
Brush the top sides of the salmon fillets evenly with the sorghum mixture.
Roast for 10 minutes, until the internal temperature reaches 110°. Remove the fillets from the oven.
Sprinkle the fillets evenly with salt.
Serve hot.
Yield:  "4 (serving size: 1 fillet)"

Per Serving: 231 Calories; 6g Fat (25.4% calories from fat); 35g Protein; 7g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 88mg Cholesterol; 415mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 5 Lean Meat; 0 Fat.

3 comments:

  1. I don't have sorghum, but have cane molasses..... do have mustard
    and have some salmon. Sounds good to me.

    ReplyDelete
  2. so you can use molasses. Do not have sorghum either. What is it and where do you get it. I am from west coast. Heard of it, but do not really know what it is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorghum grows in Iowa and many other states south of here...it looks somewhat like corn in the field. They process it like sugar cane and make syrup from it...but most of the crop is raised for animal feed and silage. The syrup is like mild molasses...but better...we think around here anyway.
      Here's a nice explanation: What is sorghum?

      Delete

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