In the Kitchen...Steamers

When Myrna started steaming vegetables enthusiastically, I purchased a steamer and have been doing the same.  I was amazed how quickly they steam
When I want to steam very small amounts or a half-dozen eggs or less, I like my cheap, $10 stainless steel steamer I purchased at my grocery that expands to fit a variety of pans.  It is sturdy, goes through the dishwasher, doesn’t stain, and folds up very small for storage.  It works in pressure cookers or instant pots too.
The directions for steaming eggs, which is the perfect way to get easy-to-peel eggs, are HERE.
I always steam potatoes now too, they are never soggy!

When I want to steam large vegetables, like broccoli, cabbage or cauliflower, I use my 2 quart stainless steel steamer that comes with a pan, insert and glass lid.  I can use the pan alone too.  
I prefer the steamer for plain vegetables.   However, that said, sometimes you want the flavor of broth or wine with your vegetables, and you need to know that cooking time as well.  Here’s a quick reference chart that I keep posted in my kitchen, inside a cabinet door.  I use the shortest cooking time for crisp-tender vegetables.
Minutes to Prepare Common Vegetables



Vegetables
Steam
Microwave
Cook in Liquid
Bake, stir fry
Asparagus
8 to 10
4 to 6 
5 to 12 
Stir-fry pieces 5 
Green beans
5 to 15
6 to 12 
10 to 20 
Stir-fry 3 to 4 
Lima Beans
10 to 20 
8 to 12 
20 to 30 

Beets
40 to 60
14 to 18
30 to 60 
Bake 60 at 350°F 
Broccoli spears
8 to 15
6 to 7 
5 to 10 

Broccoli flowerets
5 to 6
4 to 5 
4 to 5 
Stir-fry 3 to 4
Brussels sprouts
6 to 12
7 to 8 
5 to 10 

Cabbage wedges
6 to 9
10 to 12
10 to 15 

Cabbage shredded
5 to 8
8 to 10 
5 to 10 
Stir-fry 3 to 4 
Carrots, whole
10 to 15 
8 to 10
15 to 20 
Bake 30 to 40 at 350°F
Carrots, sliced
4 to 5
4 to 7 
5 to 10 
Stir-fry 3 to 4 
Cauliflower, florets
6 to 10
3 to 4 
5 to 8 
Stir-fry 3 to 4 
Corn on the cob
6 to 10
3 to 4 
4 to 7 

Corn, cut
4 to 6
2 per cup 
3 to 4 
Stir-fry 3 to 4 
Eggplant, diced
5 to 6 
5 to 6 
5 to 10 
Bake 10 to 15 425°F
Mushrooms
4 to 5
3 to 4 
3 to 4
Stir-fry or broil 4 to 5 
Onions, whole
20 to 25
6 to 10 
20 to 30 
Bake 60 at 400°F
Onions, pearl
15 to 20 
5 to 7 
10 to 20 

Peas
3 to 5
5 to 7 
8 to 12 
Stir-fry 2 to 3 
Green peppers
2 to 4
2 to 4 
4 to 5 
Stir-fry 2 to 3 
potatoes, whole
12 to 30
6 to 8 
20 to 30 
Bake 40 to 60 at 400°F
Potatoes, cut up
10 to 12
7 to 8 
15 to 20 
Bake 25 to 30 at 400°F
Spinach
5 to 6 
3 to 4
2 to 5 
Stir-fry 3 
Squash, sliced
5 to 10
3 to 6
5 to 10

Squash halves
15 to 40
6 to 10
5 to 10
Bake 40 to 60 at 375°F
Tomatoes
2 to 3
3 to 4

Bake 8 to 15 at 400°
Zucchini
5 to 10
3 to 6
5 to 10
Broil halves 5

4 comments:

  1. I have been steaming eggs since my sweet younger cousin told me how. See, this old dog learned a new trick. Cannot believe how easily they peel!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't that the truth, when I think of all the years I could have been doing that I sure wish I had known about it earlier.

      Delete
  2. A steamer would be useful for me just now, the potatoes I have at the moment seem to collapse if cooked conventionally!
    [Valerie, NZ]

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A wire rack that fits a pan you have would work. Just keep them above the water. It really helps with otatoes that tend to collapse. I hate mushy potatoes and haven't had them with steaming instead of cooking them.

      Delete

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