Challah in the food processor

  
This recipe for Challah was in the "Cuisinart’s The Connoisseur's Choice” fall 1992 newsletter.  We like egg bread, and I had an overabundance of eggs, so I tried about the only bread recipe from these leaflets that I hadn’t baked before.  I’ve been working on improving my braiding, I suspect I still have a way to go, but my loaves are looking better.  The dough was very easy to work with.
This bread is slightly sweet and delicious.  I made it without raisins, and we used a whole loaf to make great French toast and I had to make another loaf for sliced bread and regular toast – although nothing about this recipe could be called ‘regular’.   I have made it again just for French toast - it is excellent!             
                                 Challah
  3 1/4     cups  Bread Flour -- 14 3/4 ounces
  1 1/2     teaspoons  Salt
  1            package  Instant Yeast – 2 teaspoons
  3            tablespoons  Sugar
     2/3     cup  Water -- 120-125°
     1/3     cup  Salad Oil
  1            large  Egg
     3/8     cup  Raisins -- optional
                        Glaze
  1            large  Egg
     1/8     teaspoon  Salt

Mix flour, salt, yeast and sugar until just combined, 2-3 pulses.
Combine hot water, oil and egg, pouring through small feed tube in a steady steam.  Mix until dough forms a ball and cleans the side of the bowl.
Continue processing for 60 seconds to knead.  Add raisins through small feed tube whil machine is running during last 30 seconds of kneading.
Let rest in covered bowl of food processor for 10 minutes.  Punch dough down on a slightly floured surface.
If braiding, divide into 3 equal pieces (about 9 ounces)  for each loaf.  Roll into a cylinder, about 1 1/2" x 15" long.  Braid gently, tuck ends under.
Preheat oven to 375°.
Cover and let rise until doubled, about 20-25 minutes.  Brush egg with salt and egg mixture.  Bake in lower 1/3 of oven for 20 minutes.  Lower temperature to 350° and bake 10 minutes more.
2012 Cost:  $1.54 per loaf
Yield:  "1 Loaf" – about 11 slices
If you don't have a food processor, this recipe can be made on the dough cycle of a bread machine and then shaped for the last rise, or in your stand mixer or by hand, for that matter. 

5 comments:

  1. The bread recipes bring back lots of memories. My mother baked bread every Tues when I was a child and the entire kitchen table would be full of bread and kolaches and cinammon rolls cooling. That would have been the 50's and 60's and that smell is utter heaven to me still to this day.

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  2. We got to share some of the second loaf. It made great french toast!

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  3. I second the french toast...there's nothing like Challa French toast with a touch of vanilla and cinnamon.

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  4. Do you think it would be OK to substitute All Purpose flower? TIA!

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    1. Yes. Before I ever heard of bread flour, that's all I ever used.
      Bread flour usually as between 12-13% protein; all purpose flours between 9-12%. Both Gold Medal and Pillsbury all purpose flour are around 10.5%, King Arthur all-purpose is about 11.7%, closer to bread flour. Any of these should work in challah, in fact, many recipes for challah specify all-purpose flour.

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